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Racial Reconciliation Resources

Jesus Calls Us To Be Racial Reconcilers.

At Liquid, we believe we have more in common in Christ than differences that divide us. Join us as we confess and mourn the racial injustices that have been embedded in our nation’s history. Racism is not just the individual sin of a few bigoted people; it is an institutional iniquity that must be replaced with Jesus’ Kingdom vision of justice, equality, and unity for people of every race and ethnicity (Galatians 3:28). We feel called to take active steps to equip our people to be racial reconcilers who bring justice, hope, and healing to our divided world. 

As followers of Christ, the Cross is central to our faith. On the Cross, we believe God forgave our sin and reconciled us to Himself through the sacrifice of Jesus. But He didn’t stop there. On the Cross, we believe Jesus also tore down the dividing wall of hostility between people (Ephesians 2:14-18). In essence, the Cross is both a bridge to God and a battering ram that tears down walls of racial division. Jesus has given His followers the “ministry of reconciliation” and calls believers everywhere to be active bridge builders and racial reconcilers (2 Corinthians 5:18-21). The blood of Jesus bonds believers of every color as eternal spiritual family.

We acknowledge that the Church has miles to go in her journey toward authentic racial justice, reconciliation, and lasting reform. We invite you to join us in our reconciliation journey and be a part of the solution. A powerful next step is to educate yourself on the topic of racial justice and listen to the voices of others outside of your experience. We’ve curated this special collection of resources below (books, videos, podcasts) to help you broaden your perspective, dive deeper into the conversation, and enlarge your heart for life-on-life reconciliation.

Watch: Liquid Church Messages

In seeking racial reconciliation, we begin to understand each other through dialogue and relationships. We believe it's important to share our platform with other voices of color and widen the circle for our congregation. Watch these Liquid Church messages to learn and engage in our call to be ministers of reconciliation.

Read: Recommended Books

We've curated books to help you learn more about the racial issues facing our world today and how you can be an agent of reconciliation.

Be The Bridge
Latasha Morrison, author and podcast host of Be The Bridge, provides a great small group resource to begin building bridges of unity and understanding.
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Being Latino in Christ
Orlando Crespo explores what the Bible says about ethnic identity and shares his own journey of mixed heritage, and the positive impact of how God has uniquely created us.
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The Deeply Formed Life
Pastor Rich Villodas helps us understand our family of origin and how to reconcile our Christian faith with the complexities of race, sexuality, and social justice.
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Many Colors
Grow in your cultural intelligence by reading Many Colors by Soong Chan Rah to learn how to connect with our culturally changing times.
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Oneness Embraced
Tony Evans shares how Christians can find oneness despite the things that divide us. He provides a strong biblical basis for how we can help heal the racial divide.
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America's Original Sin
The sin of slavery and Jim Crow’s legacy still is at work in America. Learn where it came from and how we can end it.
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Brown Church
Robert Chao Romero explores the history and theology of the "Brown Church." For 500 years, this movement has actively pushed against injustices, including the exploitation of immigrants.
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Healing Racial Trauma
Opening our eyes to racial trauma, Sheila Wise Rowe helps people of color find healing and resilience through Christ.
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How to Fight Racism
If you’re ready to dive deeper and become an agent of reconciliation, check out How to Fight Racism by Jemar Tisby for practical ways to work towards justice and reconciliation.
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The Color of Law
Richard Rothstein reveals the forgotten history of segregation and how both government and private business promoted the practice even after the 1964 civil rights decision.
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Reading While Black
Bible scholar Esau McCaulley says reading Scripture from the perspective of Black church tradition connects us to a rich faith history and addresses today’s urgent issues.
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Watch: Powerful Videos

These curated videos are a great starting point and allow us to dive deeper into the conversation on racial injustice and the need for systemic reform.

Share: Kids' Resources

Looking for resources to help you talk about racism with your children? Our Liquid Family Staff recommends the following collection of resources to read, watch, and share around the topics of racism, culture, and faith.

Practical Next Steps

Recognize. Repent. Respond. 

We confess and mourn the racial injustices that have been embedded in our nation’s history. We commit as a church to repent and grow in our reconciliation journey.

•   Commit regular prayer time to the topic of racism.

     ○   Pray for a change in your own heart.

     ○   Pray for a change in the country as a whole.

     ○   Pray for the Church and its leaders as they work to unite all in love and equity.

•   Learn to be quick to listen and slow to speak (James 1:19).

•   Put yourselves in situations where you are the visible minority.

•   Reflect on your stereotypes and assumptions, which are usually incorrect. Continue to grow in your diversity journey by learning about unconscious bias.

•   Who are the voiceless brothers and sisters in your community? How can you help provide them a voice?

•   Continue to educate yourself. Here's a helpful Glossary of Racial Reconciliation Terms to deepen your dialog.

•   Consider starting a book club with some of the referenced books.

•   Diversify your friend group.

•   Provide time, money, and resources for those who have been historically disadvantaged.

•   Consider joining a group that is working toward racial justice.